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When preparing your artwork . . .Our art department can accept files from most professional  graphics software. We cannot accept any art that has been created using the following programs:  Word Perfect, Microsoft Works, Microsoft Word. If you have artwork that was created using one of these programs, please contact us to discuss an alternative solution.  GIFs are not acceptable. All artwork must either be saved as grayscale, bitmap(RGB) or CMYK and at a minimum of  200 dpi when possible. Please send the files in the format they were created. We can accept a wide verity of  file formats (Illustrator,  EPS,  PDF,  TIFF,  JPG, Flexi Sign, PhotoshopCorelDraw,  CMX, EMF,  WMF, AutoCad) please remember to convert all text to curves as we may not have your Fonts. We can accept: CD-Rom  / DVD and Thumb / Flash drives or arrange for an Dropbox link. Important Information about RGB and CMYK many graphics software programs give you the choice to work in either RGB or CMYK. These are called "color spaces". Scanners and digital cameras and Photoshop creates images using combinations of just three colors: Red, Green and Blue (called "RGB"). These are the primary colors of light, which computers use to display images on your screen. Printing presses print full color pictures using a different set of colors, the primary colors of pigment: Cyan, Magenta, Yellow and Black (called "CMYK"). This is "4-color process" or "full-color" printing that comprises the majority of magazines and marketing materials you see every day. At some stage your RGB file must be translated to CMYK in order to print it on a printing press. It's Best If You do the RGB-to-CMYK Conversion of Your Images You will have more control over the appearance of your printed piece if you convert all of the images from RGB to CMYK before sending them to us. When we receive RGB images, we do a standard-value conversion to CMYK, which may not be perfectly to your liking. We want you to be happy, so please, take the time to prepare your file properly. We cannot be responsible for sub-par results if you furnish your images in RGB. Even though monitors always use RGB to display colors, the colors you see on your monitor will more closely match the final printed piece if you are viewing them in the CMYK color space. Be aware that it is possible to see colors in RGB that you can't make with CMYK. They are said to be "out of the CMYK color gamut". What happens is that the RGB-to-CMYK translator just gets as close as possible to the appearance of the original and that's as good as it can be. It's something that everyone in the industry puts up with. So it's best to select any colors you use for fonts or other design elements in your layout using CMYK definitions instead of RGB. That way, you will have a better idea of how they will appear in your printed piece. Here's a common example: many programs translate the 100% Blue in RGB into a somewhat purple- looking color in CMYK. We recommend a CMYK value of 100-65-0-0 to get a nice clean blue. Working in the CMYK color space allows you to select the CMYK recipe, or "screen build", that gives you the results you want. When you create artwork for a document, You start in Photoshop. You work in RGB because of the filters and the look you want to get. However,your Indesign document and Illustrator assets are all in CMYK. So, you go back to the Photoshop file and change the image mode to CMYK. Now the problem is, it looks completely different and awful. The blacks are not black and the effects are all muted. I guess this is because the monitor is RGB that is why I see it like that I'm going to assume you haven't set Photoshop to use Adobe RGB (1998). Check 'Edit - Color Settings' and verify you're using Adobe RGB for print work. By default Photoshop uses sRGB. sRGB IEC61966-2.1 - Reflects the characteristics of the average PC monitor. This standard space is endorsed by many hardware and software manufactures, and is becoming the default color space for many scanners, low-end printers and software applications. Ideal space for Web work, but not recommended for prepress work.(because of its limited color gamut). Adobe RGB (1998) - Provides a fairly large gamut (range) of RGB colors and is well-suited for documents that will be converted to CMYK. Use this space if you need to do print production work with a broad range of color. Either way you have to eventually convert color to CMYK for press. This can drastically restrict and mute certain colors which fall outside the limitations of CMYK. (blue triangle in diagram) Your color setup in Photoshop should match the profile of the press ( North American Prepress).This is Adobe 1998 Digital art that is comprised of s pot colors (e.g., special colors: any colors that are not CMYK process colors), generally require conversion to the CMYK color space to enable file use. Because color gamut's for spot color libraries, such as those associated with the PANTONE MATCHING SYSTEM, usually extend beyond the ranges of the CMYK color gamut, some spot colors may not be represented effectively using CMYK process inks. It can sometimes be difficult to visualize the reason for color shift in color space conversion. The best way to see the color differences between the CMYK and RGB color spaces is to look at a color gamut comparison chart. The chart above plots the visible color spectrum as the large "horse shoe" area, and within this is a plot of  the CMYK colors and the RGB colors. You can see that in some areas the RGB color space is "outside" that of the CMYK space. It is these colors that will be affected by a conversion from RGB to CMYK 
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Where Imagination is Created
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425-648-9108
Northern Design Graphics Artwork When preparing your artwork . . .Our art department can accept files from most professional  graphics software. We cannot accept any art that has been created using the following programs:  Word Perfect, Microsoft Works, Microsoft Word. If you have artwork that was created using one of these programs, please contact us to discuss an alternative solution.  GIFs are not acceptable. All artwork must either be saved as grayscale, bitmap(RGB) or CMYK and at a minimum of  200 dpi when possible. Please send the files in the format they were created. We can accept a wide verity of  file formats (Illustrator,  EPS,  PDF,  TIFF,  JPG, Flexi Sign, PhotoshopCorelDraw,  CMX, EMF,  WMF, AutoCad) please remember to convert all text to curves as we may not have your Fonts. We can accept: CD-Rom  / DVD and Thumb / Flash drives or arrange for an Dropbox link. Important Information about RGB and CMYK many graphics software programs give you the choice to work in either RGB or CMYK. These are called "color spaces". Scanners and digital cameras and Photoshop creates images using combinations of just three colors: Red, Green and Blue (called "RGB"). These are the primary colors of light, which computers use to display images on your screen. Printing presses print full color pictures using a different set of colors, the primary colors of pigment: Cyan, Magenta, Yellow and Black (called "CMYK"). This is "4-color process" or "full-color" printing that comprises the majority of magazines and marketing materials you see every day. At some stage your RGB file must be translated to CMYK in order to print it on a printing press.